“Fathers of Obstetrics” Murderers?!

Woah! I’m going to have to create a new category called “bizarre, but believable”.

The just came out with a paper saying that the ‘fathers of obstetrics’, William Hunter and William Smellie were actually serial murders. Until now, history describes them as anatomists who gave us the first ‘scientific’ basis for obstetrics and midwifery. They lived over 250 years ago and are still highly regarded as pioneers in the field of obstetrics. Smellie designed and developed forceps and other obstetrical instruments and they ‘wrote the book’ on anatomy of childbirth.

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Get Me Out!- Birth History Teaches Lessons for the Present

I think I have to get this book. It’s called Get Me Out: A History of Childbirth from the Garden of Eden to the Sperm Bank By Randi Hutter Epstein. The author was recently interviewed on “Fresh Air” from NPR and I had a chance today to read the excerpt (linked above) and listen to the interview. Although her bit about Eve was a little too matter of fact for me (did that really happen- the whole rib, and apple thing?) it seems like an interesting and intriguing book worth a read for all interested in birth. We need to know the history because if we don’t know where we’ve been, then we don’t know where we’re going-right?

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Midwives and Birthing Centers are the Answer to US Healthcare Problems

As I continue to read through the evidenced-based maternity report, I am more and more convinced that moving towards midwifery based care and free-standing birthing centers could be the answer to many of our country’s healthcare woes. Charges for childbirth vary considerably depending on the type and place of birth. “The average hospital charge in 2005 ranged from about $7,000 for an uncomplicated vaginal birth to about $16,000 for a complicated cesarean section, yet out-of-hospital birth centers were about one-quarter of the charges of uncomplicated vaginal birth in hospitals ($1,624 in 2003, when the national average charge for uncomplicated vaginal birth in hospitals was $6,239) three-quarters of the expense concentrated in the hospital stay.”

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